Recipes & Skills >> Browse Articles

Browse Techniques / Guides Articles

  • +3

    How to Buy a Chef's Knife and How to Use It

    How to Buy a Chef's Knife and How to Use It
    Here are three tips to help you cut to the chase as you're choosing a chef’s knife: [photo:15100] 1. Make sure the blade extends the entire length of the knife, including through the handle. Plastic or wooden handles attached to a metal blade can break over time. 2. Don’t be afraid to cop a feel before you buy. Hold several knives ...
    Rated: +3
  • +6

    Introduction to Being a Garde Manger

    Introduction to Being a Garde Manger
    The term garde manger had evolved quite a bit since its original usage. Initially denoting the storage area in which preserved foods such as hams, sausages, and cheeses were held, it now also indicates the station within a professional kitchen where these foods are prepared, the cooks and chefs that preserve these food, as well as the specialization in culinary arts ...
    Rated: +6
  • +11

    Buffet Design

    Buffet Design
    Buffet design can be a challenge for any chef; with the Culinary Institute of America, Chef's Blade presents to you best practices for Buffet Design. Once the theme for an event is determined and you have made your best estimate of the anticipated head count, you can diagram the layout for tables, buffet lines, and stations. In addition, you can choose ...
    Rated: +11
  • +2

    Insects, Mold, and Other Legal Food Contaminants

    Insects, Mold, and Other Legal Food Contaminants
    Eating fly eggs, rodent hair, mold, and fecal matter may sound a lot like a challenge on Fear Factor, but it’s just an episode of our daily lives. Unintended additives—indiscernible to the naked eye and unlisted on ingredient labels— squirm, crawl, fly, and plop into much of what we eventually put in our mouths. In fact, these unsavory morsels are so ...
    Rated: +2
  • Rate

    The Ingredients for Preserving Foods

    The Ingredients for Preserving Foods
    From the editor: Food preservation techniques have always been intended to control the growth of microbes, halting the growth of some and encouraging the grown of others. This article summarizes the ingredients used to preserve foods. 1. Salt 2. Nitrates and Nitrites 3 Seasing and Flavoring Ingredients Salt The basic ingredient used by the garde manger to preserve foods is salt. ...
  • Rate

    Cures and Brines

    Cures and Brines
    Cure is the generic term used to indicate brines, pickling or corning solutions, or dry cures. When salt, in the form of a dry cure or brine, is applied to a food, the food is referred to as cured, brined, pickled, or corned. The term “corned” is less familiar now, but derives from the fact that the grains of salt used ...
  • +10

    How to Smoke Meat

    How to Smoke Meat
    Smoke has been intentionally applied to foods since it was first recognized that holding meats and other provisions off the ground near the smoky fires did more than dry them more quickly or prevent animals from getting to them. The hanging foods, treated to a smokebath, took on new and enticing flavors. Today we enjoy smoked foods for their special flavors. ...
    Rated: +10
  • +4

    How to Make Terrines

    How to Make Terrines
    Terrines, the shortened name of a dish known classically as pâté en terrine, are traditionally understood to be forcemeat mixtures baked in an earthenware mold with a tight-fitting lid. This preparation gets its name from its association with the material used to make the mold, once exclusively earthenware of unglazed clay, or terra cotta. Today, terrine molds are produced from materials ...
    Rated: +4
  • +6

    How to Make Pâté en Croûte

    How to Make Pâté en Croûte
    Making Pâté en Croûte Today, pâtés en croûte are often made in rectangular molds. The advantage of these molds is that they have regular dimensions and straight sides. This encourages even baking and helps reduce the chances of undercooking the dough. Another reason to choose a rectangular mold is the ability to make uniform slices. However, an oval pâté en croûte ...
    Rated: +6
  • Rate

    Ingredients in Making Sausage

    Ingredients in Making Sausage
    Sausages are made by grinding raw meats along with salt and spices. This mixture is then stuffed into the natural or synthetic casings. The original “containers” were formed from intestines, stomachs, and other animal parts. In fact, the Italian word for sausages, insacatta, literally means “encased.” Main ingredient The sausages in this chapter are made with pork, veal, beef, lamb, venison, ...
  • +3

    States and Function of Water in Cooking

    States and Function of Water in Cooking
    Water is the primary substance in most foods. Fruits and vegetables contain up to 95 percent water; raw meat is about 75 percent water. At sea level, pure water freezes (becomes solid) at 32°F/0°C and boils (turns to water vapor or steam) at 212°F/100°C. Boiling leads to evaporation, which makes reduction possible. Water is a powerful solvent. Many vitamins, minerals, and ...
    Rated: +3
  • +8

    Food Science Basics: Forming Emulsions

    Food Science Basics: Forming Emulsions
    An emulsion occurs when two substances that do not normally mix are forced into a mixture in which one of the substances is evenly dispersed in the form of small droplets throughout the other substance. Under normal conditions, fat (either liquid oil or solid fat) and water do not mix, but these two substances are the most common ingredients in culinary ...
    Rated: +8
  • +2

    The Ultimate Guide to Food Safety

    The Ultimate Guide to Food Safety
    Foods can serve as carriers for many different illnesses. Use this guide, provided to Chef's Blade by The Culinary Institute of America, to learn everything you need to know about food safety. 1. Introduction 2. Food Pathogens 3. :/training/articles/229-regulations-inspection-and-certification
    Rated: +2
  • +6

    A Guide to Food Pathogens

    A Guide to Food Pathogens
    The specific types of pathogens responsible for foodborne illnesses are fungi, viruses, parasites, and bacteria. Fungi, which include molds and yeast, are more adaptable than other microorganisms and have a high tolerance for acidic conditions. They are more often responsible for food spoilage than for food-borne illness. Fungi are important to the food industry in the production of cheese, bread, wine, ...
    Rated: +6
  • +3

    6 Things You Should Know About Chicken

    September is National Chicken Month! Don't miss out before it's too late! September is National Chicken Month and to celebrate, we worked with featured writer Danielle Turner to create a guide to the juicy, white meat we all love! First up, some quick facts on chicken! 1. Chicken Skin Color 2. Free Range Chicken 3. Determining "Doneness" 4. How Long ...
    Rated: +3
  • +6

    Chef Essentials: Hollandaise Sauce

    Chef Essentials: Hollandaise Sauce
    Since the largest part of hollandaise is butter, the success or failure of the sauce depends not only on skillfully combining egg yolks, water, acid, and butter into a rich, smooth sauce, but also on the quality of the butter itself. Hollandaise sauce is prepared by emulsifying melted or clarified butter and water (in the form of an acidic reduction and/or ...
    Rated: +6
  • +3

    Chef Essentials: Beurre Blanc

    Chef Essentials: Beurre Blanc
    Traditionally, beurre blanc is prepared as an integral part of the shallow- poaching process, using the reduction cooking liquid (cuisson). Another common practice is to prepare a reduction separately and make the beurre blanc in a larger batch so it can be used as a grand sauce on which derivative sauces are based. As with hollandaise, beurre blanc derivatives are prepared ...
    Rated: +3
  • +3

    The Purpose of Sauces

    The Purpose of Sauces
    Most sauces have more than one function in a dish. A sauce that adds a counterpoint flavor, for example, may also introduce textural and visual appeal. Sauces generally serve one or more of the following purposes. Introduce complementary or counterpoint flavors Sauces that are classically paired with particular foods illustrate this function. Suprême sauce is based on a reduction of chicken ...
    Rated: +3
  • +1

    How to Pair Sauces

    How to Pair Sauces
    Certain classic sauce combinations endure because the composition is well balanced in all areas: taste, texture, and eye appeal. When choosing an appropriate sauce, it should be: • Suitable for the style of service. In a banquet setting or in any situation where large quantities of food must be served rapidly and at the peak of flavor, choose a sauce that ...
    Rated: +1
  • +1

    7 Food Science Facts

    Knowing food science principles will give you new tools to create exception dishes There are dozens of scientific principles at work during the cooking process. As an introduction to the topic of food science, this guide, provided to Chef's Blade by The Culinary Institute of America, provides an overview of these principles. Topics: 1. Egg Structure and Uses 2. Effects ...
    Rated: +1